The industry built on Victorian social engineering

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Image copyright Paul Rabbitts
Image caption The Leas bandstand on Folkestone seafront was made by the James Allan Elmbank Foundry and put up in 1895.

Victorian bandstands stay a popular function in lots of parks and open areas throughout the UK. Why were so numerous of them constructed in Scotland?

Many of the more prominent Victorians had fret about the working class.

With what little bit free time they had actually, those utilized in the factories and mines may consume alcohol, or even worse.

What was required was something more enhancing.

Image copyright Paul Rabbitts
Image caption Louise Carnegie, the spouse of the industrialist Andrew Carnegie, talented a bandstand from the Saracen Foundry to individuals of Dunfermline. This image dates from her go to in 1887.

And, according to historian Paul Rabbitts, bandstands were a really public part of this dedication to uplifting activity.

“Their function became part of what they called ‘purchased, reasonable leisure’,” states Paul.

“It was actually something to get the working classes – to get them into parks and open areas, and provide something that was far more bought and managed leisure and entertainment.

“Basically it was to get them out of the gin palaces and the clubs.

“They saw music as becoming part of that, and the bandstands came out of that.”

Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption Many bandstands, such as this one in the centre of Chester, are still in routine usage.

This effort at social engineering developed a financial tradition, with workshops in the main belt of Scotland making a lot of the bandstands set up throughout the UK and beyond.

Image copyright Paul Rabbitts
Image caption This 1896 Saracen bandstand was put up in Worthing seafront. It is among lots of which have actually vanished entirely.
Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption Dun Laoghaire in Dublin still has this great example of a Walter MacFarlane bandstand.

“It was all to do with the sort of ore that was discovered in the hills simply outside Glasgow,” Paul states.

“The ore there was best for smelting and casting of iron. What you discovered was you had an entire market grow up in and around Glasgow.

“One of the extremely earliest foundries was Carron Ironworks near Falkirk however the most significant maker of all was Walter MacFarlane and the Saracen Foundry in Possilpark in Glasgow.

“They actually cornered the market.”

Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption One of the lots of Saracen bandstands makes it through on the esplanade at Bognor Regis.
Image copyright Paul Rabbitts
Image caption Bandstands from Walter MacFarlane’s works were exported around the globe. This one remains in Elder Park in Adelaide, South Australia.
Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption Some of the bandstands, such as here at Hexham in Northumberland, can be lit during the night.
Image copyright Paul Rabbitts
Image caption Bandstands maintained their initial function for years, drawing in crowds who may otherwise squander their time. This one by the Lion Foundry in Kirkintilloch remained in Elder Park in Govan.

Paul states MacFarlane was “an extremely creative male”.

“What he did was that he was excellent at marketing.

“So nowadays we consider given the web, and brochures which type of things.

“He utilized marketing through released brochures that revealed bandstands and all the other kind of things that they cast.

“He marketed them nationally however likewise worldwide too.”

Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption Walter MacFarlane provided us among the most photographed bandstands on the planet, at Brighton in East Sussex.
Image copyright Paul Rabbitts
Image caption For several years Corporation Park in Blackburn included a bandstand by the Lion Foundry in Kirkintilloch.
Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption The bandstand at Clapham Common in the London Borough of Lambeth dates from 1890 and was brought back in 2006.
Image copyright Paul Rabbitts
Image caption So enjoyed were bandstands that they frequently included in postcards. This Elmbank Foundry structure in Sheffield’s Weston Park dates from 1875 and has actually just recently been brought back.
Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption The bandstand in Shrewsbury dates from 1887 and has actually been thoroughly brought back. It was made at the Milton Ironworks in Glasgow.

Recent years have actually seen a renaissance in Britain’s bandstands, with numerous being brought back or reconstructed utilizing lottery game financing.

Some, such as the one at Wilton Lodge Park in Hawick, had actually gone practically without trace.

Paul states: “All that was left was the residues of the plinth, which ended up being a flowerbed and after that a fishpond and after that an empty piece of open area.

“They got lotto loan and returned a reproduction of the initial Scottish bandstand back therein.”

Image copyright Jim Barton/Geograph
Image caption The bandstand at Wilton Lodge Park in Hawick is among more than 100 resuscitated with lottery game financing.

All images undergo copyright.

Read more: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-glasgow-west-49472083

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